Post-racism redux . . .

 

Leonard Pitts wrote in a recent column: “People sometimes act as if the past is a distant country, a far, forgotten place we ought never revisit, unless it be for the occasional purpose of congratulating ourselves on how far we have come.

But the past has this way of crashing the party. Usually it does so with the relative subtlety of statistics quantifying ongoing racial bias in hiring, education and criminal justice. Occasionally, it does so with the bluntness of sign reading ‘Niggerhead.’” (Miami Herald, October 5, 2011, p. 19A)

In a review of Toure’s book, Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?What it Means to be Black Now, there’s this quote: “Post-black identity resides in the need to live with and transcend new and subtle but pervasive forms of racism. This new racism is invisible and unknowable, always lurking in the shadows, the secret decisions of whites resulting in lost opportunities blacks never knew about or even thought possible. “There’s a sense of malevolent ghosts darting around you, screwing with you, often out of sight but never out of mind.” New York Times Book Review, Orlando Patterson, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011

I listen to people talk these days, with dissent meaning treason and income equality called class warfare, and I remember when one relatively small group in Mississippi, led by the Citizens Council, were able to silence an entire State. Can a relatively small group today silence an entire country?

2 responses »

  1. sondra alexander

    I think they are doing it.

    Are the 99% making a difference in racial matters or anything else? I guess time will tell. Race seems to have been subsumed into the class picture.

    Sondra

    Reply
  2. Excellent. And yes, it has been proven that a small group of concerned citizens can make a marked difference, Wasn’t there a quote by Margaret Mead about that?
    My generation helped to stop the Vietnam War, and we were arested, beat up, and some killed. But we did it.
    The people united can never be defeated.

    Reply

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